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    5 Amazing Day Hikes In Vancouver, BC This Summer!

    5 Amazing Day Hikes In Vancouver, BC This Summer!

    5 Amazing Day Hikes Near Vancouver, British Columbia



    As Vancouver's hottest days are upon us, this is the perfect time to start planning some day hikes in the Pacific NorthWest! 

    What I find most amazing about our home base in Vancouver is living in an urban environment but still having amazing backcountry wilderness on our doorstep. All of these 5 hikes are within 1-2 hours driving distance from the city of Vancouver and they can be completed in a single day. 

    1. Dog Mountain

    The Dog Mountain bluffs offer the best-hike-to-view ratio in the Lower Mainland. It is a quick 25 minutes drive from downtown and it only takes about 1 or 2 hours to complete.

    The trailhead begins just past the Bear’s Paw lodge at the far end of the Mount Seymour parking lot. In the summer, the Dog Mountain bluffs and the other ridgelines higher up in Mount Seymour Provincial Park are an excellent place to watch meteor showers and observe the northern lights. While you can’t camp on the Dog Mountain bluffs, there are many backcountry camping spots in the park where you can camp with a view of the sparkling lights of Vancouver from your campsite.

    2. Stawamus Chief

    Photo by OutdoorVancouver.ca 

    The Stawamus Chief, or “The Chief”, is the second largest free standing granite outcropping in the world (after the Rock of Gibraltar). There are three domed summits you can hike to, all accessed by a trail that starts on the side of Stawamus Chief Provincial Park near Shannon Falls. The lowest dome takes about 3 hours and the highest dome takes 5 hours (all times are return trips).

    The Chief in Squamish is also a world-famous rock climbing destination. Many professional climbers will spend the summer months living in the Stawamus Chief Provincial Park campground at the base. There are also day climbing tours available in the nearby town of Squamish to climb one of the many challenges routes on the front face.

    For more info feel free to check out this link by Outdoor Vancouver

    3. St. Mark’s Summit



    A spectacular view over the mouth of Howe Sound. You can see Bowen Island on top left, the smaller Anvil Island to the right and the mountains of Vancouver Island fade into the clouds in the distance.

    St Mark’s summit is an intermediate hike that starts by the Cypress Mountain day lodge. It winds 11 km along the Howe Sound Crest Trail. It takes about 5 hours to get to the summit and back.

    If you’re really ambitious and you want to hike the entire Howe Crest Sound Trail it takes 1-2 days to hike the full 32 km. There are many other mountains along the trail that have much better views like the Binkert Lions, Unnecessary Mountain and Mount Harvey, but St. Mark’s Summit is the easiest hike and the other peaks can be difficult to reach until mid-to-late summer when the snow has melted.

    4. Mount Cheam

    Mount Cheam is the highest peak in the Fraser Valley but also one of the easiest climbs thanks to a logging road that gets you within a one-hour hike of the summit. The road is snowed-in for most of the year so the best time to go is between July and October.

    The backcountry forest road can be accessed from Chilliwack Lake road and you will need a 4×4 vehicle. You can find more information on how to get there on the Mount Cheam hike page provided by Vancouver Trails.

    5. Garibaldi Lake

    The view of the aqua blue waters of Garibaldi Lake and Mount Garibaldi from the Panorama Ridge.

    The 3-hour hike up to Garibaldi Lake is a tedious trek along seemingly endless switchbacks. But once you arrive at Garibaldi Lake you will be blown away by just how insanely beautiful this glacial lake is. While it can be done in a day, it is better to spend a few days at the beautiful campground along the southern shore.

    Book ahead at the Garibaldi Lake Provincial Park campground and from there you can hike to Panorama Ridge, the Battleship Islands, Black Tusk (a highly recommended 3 hour hike from the campground where you can see Whistler and the Pacific Ocean from the same peak), Cheakamus Lake and the amazing wildflowers in the Black Tusk meadows (best seen between the middle of July and middle of August).

    There you have it, our 5 Amazing Day Hikes in Vancouver, BC this Summer! Looking to Rep Your Pacific NorthWest on the trails? Pick up your PNW Lifestyle Swag here

    URBAN WILDERNESS

    URBAN WILDERNESS

    URBAN WILDERNESS

    For many, Vancouver is synonymous with “the great outdoors.” The city is known as a natural playground, and there is certainly no shortage of ways to lose yourself in our wilderness: from kayaking up a fjord to skiing down a mountain; hiking across a range or climbing a sheer rock face. But you don’t have to travel far to get a taste of Vancouver’s natural side.

    Stanley Park is located on the northern half of the city’s downtown peninsula – around 1,000 acres of hiking trails, beaches, old-growth forest, gardens, attractions and activities. The walk into the park is about 20 minutes from most downtown hotels, but you’ll feel a lot more than 20 minutes away from the hustle and bustle.

    Lost Lagoon is home to a wide variety of water birds – stop in at the Stanley Park Nature House to learn more about the park’s wildlife. Or stroll along the seawall to the Vancouver Aquarium, lauded for its marine stewardship program. The Stanley Park section of the seawall stretches 9 km (5.5 miles) around the perimeter of the park, and walking this will take you past attractions such as the popular totem poles at Brockton Point, public artworks, the Second Beach Pool, and plenty of photo-worthy vistas.

    Whether you arrive via the seawall or by hiking through the trails in the middle of the park, you’ll want to make sure you stop at one of the beaches. Both Second and Third Beach offer perfect opportunities to take off your shoes, wiggle your toes in the sand, then sit back against a log to relax as you enjoy the view, the sun glinting off the water as you take it all in.

    For more information on Stanley Park, click here.

    Source: Tourism Vancouver